The Good Old Days

I handed my cheque to the hardware store clerk. He wrote out a receipt and taped it to the stock of the 12-gauge, pump action shotgun I had just bought. As I walked out of the store, gun in hand, the thought popped into my teenage mind. I hope I have enough in my bank account to cover that cheque.

No problem, my bank was just across the street, so I crossed Gaetz Avenue, walked into the bank, and shotgun in the crook of my arm, waited in line behind the other customers. When it was my turn, I stepped up to the teller’s window, laid the shotgun on the counter, pulled my passbook from my pocket, and asked the clerk to update it. He did so, and I noted happily that there was enough to cover the cheque. Picking up my shotgun, I ambled out of the bank and walked for half an hour through town to my home on Michener hill.

It was the mid-1950’s and no one raised an eyebrow in Red Deer, Alberta. Rifles and shotguns were a common sight. Most farm pickup trucks had gun racks across the back window holding a shotgun or a rifle, or both.

Those were the “good old days.” No mass shootings in schools or churches. No elbows or cell phones at the table. No oranges or bananas except at Christmas time. No pineapples except in pieces in a tin can. No pizza, pasta, kebabs, or chicken fingers. All drinking water came out of a tap, not from bottles. Prunes were for medicinal use only. Sugar was used everywhere, as was lard for baking and cooking. Muesli was plentiful, it was called cattle feed.

Seat belts were installed only in airplanes. Nearly every man and many women smoked cigarettes constantly. At recess, every Monday morning, us high school guys would tell funny stories of our dads, uncles or neighbours driving drunk over the weekend. Comics on the Saturday night radio shows always had some drunk-driving jokes.

A visit to the principal’s office to “get the strap” was a serious matter for troublemakers like those who chewed gum in class. That heavy leather strap caused a good deal of pain on the open hand. The “Three R’s” song about “Reading and ‘Riting and ‘Rithmatic, taught to the tune of a hickory stick,” was all too true. That hickory stick was not just for pointing out things on a map!

In the 1950s, and before, evangelical Christians in Western Canada did not smoke, drink alcohol, enter beer parlours, attend dances, play billiards, or go to movies. Hollywood was typified as Sin City where actors were forced to passionately kiss persons they were not married to. And it was general knowledge that any young woman wanting to succeed as a movie actress would need to “give herself” to the men who could advance her career.

A good deal has changed since those “good old days”. What was “par for the course” back then gradually became no longer acceptable.

Fortunately, police cannot retroactively ticket every 1950s driver who was not wearing a seat belt. People suffering heart attacks do not sue their mothers for using lard to make those fabulous pie crusts. Red Deer police will not be charged with negligence for letting a teenager walk into a bank carrying a shotgun.

Cultures tend to change from one decade to the next. In the late 1960’s seatbelt use became law. In the 1980s Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD) changed the culture about driving drunk from a joke to a criminal offense. In the 1990s laws were passed to keep all firearms out of sight and locked securely when not in use. Smoking is generally seen as an unhealthy habit and non-smokers feel sorry for those still addicted to tobacco.

Lately we have noticed some changes even in the entertainment and business communities. Now movie actresses and women in business, insist they should not need to “give themselves” to the men who have the power to advance their careers.
There are not yet any laws against this practice, but it does seem as if a little bit of Christian morality is finally seeping into the entertainment and business culture.

As a Christian I’m happy to see this.